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   Umaid Bhawan   


Umaid Bhawan


Behari Marg via Bank Road
Bani Park
Jaipur, Rajasthan
India  302016
Architectural Type:  Historic Heritage Home
Established In:  1950
Renovated In:  2003
Phone:  +91 (0)141-2206426
Fax:  +91 (0)141-2207445
Mobile:  +91 (0)9314503423
Contact:  Ranvijay RATHORE
 Send An Email:
Single Occupant Rate Is: USD $35
Double Occupant Rate Is: USD $45
Additional Occupant Rate Is: USD $15
Accepted Payments: Cash, MasterCard, Visa, Travelers Checks, Diners Club, Euros
Deposit Amount Requested: None
Minimum Stay Is: 1 night
Check In Time Is: 12 Noon
Check Out Time Is: 12 Noon
Cancellation Policy: Cancelled 24 hours before checking than no cancellation fee.

Your home away from home.

Run by a family of Rathores from the erstwhile state of Jodhpur, Umaid Bhawan is one of the finest places to stay in Jaipur.

Built in the traditional Rajput style, there are beautifully carved balconies, attractive courtyards, open terraces, a lovely garden and comfortable rooms with antique furnishings.

Enjoy the exotic attractions of a traditional Rajasthani ambience while enjoying the luxury of modern amenities.

Owned by Wing Commander (Dr.) Bhim Singh Rathore, a retired Air Force Officer, Umaid Bhawan is an old heritage property converted into a family run hotel situated in a posh residential colony in the heart of Jaipur city. Just 1.2 kilometers. from the Railway Station, and Bus Stand, Umaid Bhawan is ideally located for both the tourist as well as the business traveler and it offers a quite retreat from the hustle and bustle of the lively town of Jaipur.

Ranked as one of the best run budget hotels in Jaipur by the Lonely Planet international travel guide book, Umaid Bhawan offers guests a pleasant and comfortable home away from home with traditional Rajput hospitality.

Rooms:

Hotel Umaid Bhawan offers you a wide variety of accommodation ranging from Standard rooms to Suites that will suite every budget.

Our rooms at Umaid Bhawan been designed and furnished to showcase the skill and expertise of Rajasthani artisans.

However, our main goal is to create an atmosphere that allows the guest to feel, "Truly At Home - Away from Home".

Room Amenities:

  • Study desks
  • Room service
  • Direct dial telephone
  • Direct cable television
  • Running hot and cold water
  • Attached European style bathrooms
  • Most rooms have private balconies, request a room with a balcony while making a reservation

Services and Features:

Umaid Bhawan offers a wide range of personalized services and facilities to help make your stay in Jaipur a memorable one.

The Swimming Pool:

Enjoy a rejuvenating swim in the azure depths of our swimming pool. Or you could just choose to sit by the pool and read a book. See more pictures of our pool in the picture gallery.

Business Center / Internet Café:

Stay in touch with the world even as you lose yourself in the fantasy that is Rajasthan. You always have the option of connecting with friends and family, wherever they may be.

Our modern business center has everything you need. While you may choose to stay in your room to make long distance calls, we also have an Internet Cafe where you can surf the net, chat with friends, and exchange email while enjoying a quite cup of coffee.

Dining at the Umaid Bhawan:

Umaid Bhawan has a delectable range of Indian cuisine on offer. Enjoy the food prepared for you by our traditional cooks and supervised by the lady of the house while absorbing the traditional ambience of our cosy and private dining room. You could also choose to sit outside and eat while enjoying a puppet show.

Complete List of Services:

  • Car rental
  • Air ticketing
  • Doctor on call
  • Bus reservation
  • Railway reservation
  • Desert and village safari
  • Same day laundry service
  • Airline ticket reconfirmation
  • Business center / Internet café
  • Hotel reservations around India
  • Folk dance and puppet show on demand
  • Car and minibus rental, local site-seeing and guide arrangement
  • Complementary pickups from railway, bus and airport on demand
  • Tailor made tours and safaris in and around Jaipur and in Rajasthan

Jaipur - The Pink City:

Umaid Bhawan is located in a quiet residential colony in Jaipur, the capital of India's desert state; Rajasthan.

Only a kilometer from the central bus stand (Sindhi Camp) and the railway station, we are 13 kilometers away from the airport.

We offer a free pickup on arrival to Jaipur from the bus stand, the railway station, the city centre and the airport. Use our contact form to request a pickup.

Jaipur is well connected. Being right next to the national capital, New Delhi, it is easy to get to.

A flamboyant showcase of Rajasthani architecture and flair at its most irresistible, the Pink City of Jaipur has long been established on tourist itineraries as the third corner of India's "Golden Triangle", just 300 kilometers southwest of Delhi and 200 kilometers west of Agra. As with most of India, Jaipur too, offers a unique combination of the ancient and the modern. While you can relax in the evenings in modern pubs, you can discover the massive ancient forts during the day.

Places To See:

Though the "Pink City" label applies specifically to the old walled quarter of the Rajasthani capital, in the northeast of town, glorious palaces and temples, in an assortment of styles that span the centuries, are scattered throughout the whole urban area. The walled city is suffused with a gentle pink light, flashed through by bright turbans and saris, while in the pink shops and houses that line its orderly streets, craftsmen create objects of delicate beauty with time-honored traditional skills, in full view of the hectic swirl of shoppers and tourists outside.

Lying on the bed of a long-dry lake, Jaipur laps against hills in the north, east and west, and rolls across the open plains to the south towards Bundi. Getting and keeping your bearings is simple; even if you can't see the Pink City, the hills behind it in the northeast, topped by the high walls of the Nahagarh Fort, are always conspicuous.

The Pink City houses the principal tourist attractions - the Palace of Winds or Hawa Mahal, and Jai Singh's City Palace and Observatory - while the Ram Niwas Garden, Zoo, Albert Hall (Central Museum) and Modern Art Gallery are a short way south of the walls, within easy walking distance of its gates. Broad and widely spaced roads in the newer areas outside the walls accommodate the industries and businesses that underlie the economy of the modern city, as well as most of Jaipur's hotels. Mirza Imail Road is the main route from west to east (south of the old city), on which you'll find the GPO, hotels and restaurants and some of the larger boutiques and jewellery shops. Station Road runs from the railway station in the west, past the bus stand and on to Chand Pole, the westernmost gate of the old city.

Most travelers spend a good few days visiting the sublime palaces, exploring the ruins and wandering through the bazaars, renowned for carpets, clothes and the best selection of precious stones and metals in India.

If you're anywhere near Jaipur in March, don't miss the Elephant Festival, one of India's most flamboyant parades, celebrated with full Rajput pomp. Makar Sankranti (14 January), predominantly celebrated in the east of India, here takes the form of a kite festival, filling the air with gaudy paper kites for days leading up to it.

About Rajasthan:

Rajasthan, India's desert state, was once a collection of princely kingdoms where feudal traditions still carry on amidst forts and palace hotels. Rajasthan is where all the country’s similes and metaphors appear to have come together to create a visual extravaganza.

Majestic palaces and rugged forts, spectacular deserts, wooded hills and tranquil lakes, bustling towns and quiet villages, amazing flora and fauna and of course, the colorful and vibrant people of Rajasthan form an intricate tapestry of mysticism, grandeur and rusticity. Behind the breathtaking beautiful facade, expect to find contradictions to the ordinary and mundane aspects of vacationing. Wherever you travel, particularly when you escape from the popular tourist destinations, you will come across the unexpected, whether it is a local fair or a bustling bazaar or mind-blowing architectural wonders. The mood and the rhythm of the countryside changes from one region to another, and from season to season. It is a land of magical fantasies that remain a lifetime memory.

Rajasthan is situated in the north-western part of India. It covers 342,239 square kilometres (132,139 square miles). Rajasthan lies between latitudes 23 degree 3' and 30 degree 12' north and longitudes 69 degree 30' and 78 degree 17' east. Compared to many countries that are located in a similar latitudinal belt, such as in northern Arabia, Rajasthan has a less harsh climate. The State's scorching and dry summers and its parched landscape is undergoing significant changes because of the developmental effort that have led to the spread of the Indira Gandhi Nahar.

The southern part of Rajasthan is about 225 km from the Gulf of Kutch and about 400 km from the Arabian Sea. Rajasthan is bounded by Pakistan in the west and north-west; by the State of Punjab in the north; by Haryana in the north-east; by Uttar Pradesh in the east, by Madhya Pradesh in the south-east and Gujarat in the south-west.

The Aravali mountain ranges that run from Delhi to Gujarat cut through the State almost vertically. The Aravali ranges divide the State through south-east and north-west. The north-west region covering two-thirds of the state consist mostly of a series of sand dunes. Bikaner, Jaisalmer, Jodhpur and part of the Jhunjhunu districts form part of this region. The eastern region has large fertile tracts.

The climate of Rajasthan varies from semi arid to arid. The mercury touches 49 degrees centigrade at some places during summer and drops below freezing point during winter.

Though the average annual rainfall ranges between 200-400 mm, it is as low as 150 mm in extreme arid zones and as high as 1000 mm in the south eastern part of the State. Most of the rainfall (60-80%) is received with the South west monsoon in the period from July to September. The average number of rainy days vary from 6 to 42 depending on the aridity of the area.

Cuisines of Rajasthan:

Each region in India has its own traditional dishes and specialties. In the royal kitchens of Rajasthan, as well as most other states, food was very serious business and raised to the level of an art-form. Hundreds of cooks worked in the stately palaces and kept their recipes a closely guarded secret. Some recipes were passed on to their sons and the rest were lost for ever. It became a matter of great prestige to serve unusual dishes to guests and the royal cooks were encouraged to experiment. The tales of how cooks tried to impress their guests by presenting at least one unforgettable item on the menu have now become legends. The monthly budget ran into lakhs of rupees and the royal guests were treated to such delicacies as stuffed camels, goats, pigs and peacocks... it was perfectly normal to have live pigeons and other birds fly out of elaborately decorated dishes. The food was served in gold and silver utensils and the number of dishes at one meal ran into hundreds. It was usually never possible to taste all the delicacies sewed.

The finest cooking in India was derived from the Mughals and did influence the royal kitchens of India, as did European cooking. But the common man’s kitchen remained untouched, more so in Rajasthan. Cooking here has its own unique flavour and the simplest, the most basic of ingredients go into the preparation of most dishes.

Rajasthani cooking was influenced by the war-like lifestyle of its inhabitants and the availability of ingredients in this region. Food that could last for several days and could be eaten without heating was preferred, more out of necessity than choice. Scarcity of water, fresh green vegetables have all had their effect on the cooking. In the desert belt of Jaisalmer, Barmer and Bikaner, cooks use the minimum of water and prefer, instead, to use more milk, buttermilk and clarified butter. Dried lentils, beans from indigenous plants like sarigri, ker, etc are liberally used. Gram flour is a major ingredient here and is used to make some of the delicacies like khata, gatta ki sabzi, pakodi, powdered lentils are used for mangodi, papad. Bajia and corn is used at! over the state for preparations of rabdi, kheechdi, and rotis. Various chutneys are made from locally available spices like turmeric, coriander, mint and garlic.

Perhaps the best known Rajasthani food is the combination of dal, bati and churma but for the adventurous traveler, willing to experiment, there is a lot of variety available. Besides spicy flavours, each region is distinguished by its popular sweet Ladoos from Jodhpur and Jaisalmer, Malpuas from Pushkar, Jalebies from most big cities, Rasogullas from Bikaner, Dil Jani from Udaipur, Mishri Mawa and Ghevar from Jaipur, Sohan Haiwa from Ajmer, Mawa from Alwar...

Festivals In Rajasthan:

Camel Festival:

The camel festival is organised by the Department of Tourism of the Rajasthan Government in January every year in Bikaner. The festival begins with a colourful procession of bedecked camels against the red sandstone backdrop of the Junagarh fort. The camels display amazing footwork, dancing gracefully to the directions of their trainers. bridal bridles, bejeweled necks, jingling anklets and camel shadows, cast a spell on the audience. In the evenings, is held a traditional rendezvous of renowned artistes and folk performers of Rajasthan.

Nagaur Fair:

The fair is held every year in January-February in Nagaur, is a trading fair for cattle and camels and gives one an opportunity to catch up with rural life as owners from all over the state camp on the outskirts of the town while they buy and sell animals. the hides of the animals, cut into wonderful patterns, are particularly attractive.

Mewar Festival:

This 18-day festival is celebrated to welcome the advent of spring and coincides with the festival of Gangaur in Udaipur. It is significant for the women of the state as it is time for them to dress in their best. The women gather to dress the images of Issar and Gangaur and then carry them in a ceremonial procession through different parts of the city. The procession ends up at Pichhola Lake where the images are transferred to special boats amidst singing and festivity. Cu1tura events are held at the end of the festivities and they include songs, dances and a display of fireworks.

Kaila Devi Fair:

The fair is held in March or April in Kaila village in Karauli district and it holds an important place among the celebrated fairs of the state. The fortnight-long fair is held on the banks of the river Kalisil in the hills of Trikut about 2 kilometres from Kaila village. It houses the images of Mahalakshrni and Chamunda. Kaila Devi has been regarded as the guardian deity throughout the ages by the Khinchis, the Yadavas and the princes of Karauli. A small temple dedicated to Bhairon is situated in the courtyard and facing the shrine of the devi is the temple of Hanuman. Throughout the year, there is a steady flow of devotees.

Mahavir Ji Fair:

This fair is held at Mahavir Ji between March and April to commemorate Shri Mahavir Swami, the 24th tirthankara (saint) of the Jams. The temple is located in an enclosure known as ‘katala’ where devotees come to pay homage.

Summer Festival:

The three-day festival is held at Mount Abu in June every year and is a feast of folk and classical music and window to the tribal life and culture of Rajasthan. The festival begins with the singing of a ballad which is followed by Gaiç Ghoomar and Dhap folk dances. Boat races and qawwalis are also organised.

Teej Festival:

Held during the monsoons, July Teej is also dedicated to Lord Shiva and Parvati and this time it is married women who pray for a happy and long married life. Though celebrations are held all over the state, it is particularly colourful in jaipur where a procession winds Its way for two days through the Old City. It is the festival of swings which are decorated with flowers and hung from trees. Young girls and women dressed in green clothes sing songs in celebration of the advent of the monsoon. The Teej idol is covered with a canopy whereas the Gangaur idol is open.

Gogaji Fair:

The fair is held at Gogamedi in Ganganagar district in August in memory of a popular hero of the area known as Goga among the Hindus and Jahar Peer among the Muslims. The Kayam Khani Muslims claim to be descendants of his. Gogaji is popular as a snake god and almost every village in Rajasthan has a sacred place dedicated to him. Staunch followers of Gogaji believe that by invoking his name, a snake bite and other diseases can be cured. It is said that Gogaji went into samadhi at GogaMedi and thousands of devotees gather there to pay homage at his memorial every day during the Fair which lasts three days. The samadhi is a marble structure with two minarets fortified by a boundary wall. The idol of Gogaji is seated on a blue horse with a snake coiled around the neck.

Kaliteej:

Though Kaliteej is celebrated all over the state, the one in Bundi is different in the sense that it is held on different dates from the rest of the state. The festival starts with the procession of goddess Teej in a decorated palanquin from the imposing Naval Sagar and passes through the main bazaars. The procession comprises decorated elephants, camels, bands, performing artists and colourfully dressed people. Though the main function is held for only two days, the celebrations continue into Janamashtami, which marks the birth of Lord Krishna.

Ramdevra Fair:

The Ramdevra Fair is held in Ramdevra village in Jaisalmer in August or September The village has got its name after Baba Ramdev, a Tanwar Rajput, who took samadhi in 1458 He had miraculous powers and legend goes that five peers from Mecca came to test his powers. After being convinced, they paid homage to him. The Hindus regard him as an incarnation of Lord Krishna. A large fair is held here which is atteflded by lakhs of devotees who come in large groups from various places. Bhajans and kirtans right through the night are organised.

Marwar Festival:

Held in October in Jodhpur, this annual two-day event attempts to showcase the art and culture of the Jodhpur region. It is devoted mainly to singing and dancing. Originally known as the Maand festival, the folk dancers provide a glimpse of the days of yore, of battles and valiant heroes who still live on in their songs. Other attractions are camel tattoo show and polo. The venues are the impressive Umaid Bhavan Palace, Mandore and the Mehrangarh fort.

Dusshera:

Dusshera is celebrated all over the country in different ways as also in Rajasthan. It celebrates the triumph of good over evil the victory of Lord Rama over Ravana. The tale of Rama and Sita and the battle fought between Lord Rama and Ravana are enacted on stage and it is called Ramlila. On the tenth day of the festival, huge effigies of the ten-headed Ravana and his brother Kumbakaran, stuffed with thousands of fire crackers, are set afire and the people then begin to rejoice.

Pushkar Fair:

Easily the most identifiable of all the fairs of the state, the Pushkar fair is held in November in Pushkar in Ajmer, where an eighth century temple of Brabma, draws the faithful. The place has about 400 shrines and temples around the lake. Legend has it that Lord Brahma, in search of a place to hold his yagna (religious ritual), dropped the lotus from his hand and the three spots touched by the flower were turned into lakes. These are today known as the Jyeshtha Pushkar, Madhyam Pushkar and Kanishtha Pushkar. Pilgrims bathe at the ghats and pray at the temple. Traders strike deals at the world’s largest camel fair, although horses are also sold. People gather together to camp in the desert and entertain each other with songs and dances and cook meals over camp fires. The camel, horse and donkey races are also popular and draw huge attendance. Rajasthan Tourism puts up a tourist village.

Chandrabhaga Fair:

This three-day fair is held at Jhalrapatan near Jhalawar either in November or December next to the banks of the Chandrabhaga river which is considered holy by the people living in this part of the state. On the full moon night of Kartik Purnima, thousands of pilgrims take a dip in the rivet There is also a big cattle fair in which cows, horses, buffaloes, camels and bullocks are brought for sale.

Kolyat Fair:

Bikaner is the venue for this fair which lasts 10 days and the place is the sacred site where Kapil Muni is supposed to have meditated. The place has a lake with 52 ghats shaded by banyan trees. Devotees take a dip in the lake and pray in the temples. Aarti is performed twice a day and bhog is offered. People float lighted lamps in the sacred lake as part of the rituals. A cattle fair is also held where buffaloes, camels, horses and cattle are sold. Certificates and prizes are given away to the best breeders at the fair.

Cities In Rajasthan:

Jaipur:

Rajasthan's beautiful Pink City Jaipur, was the stronghold of a clan of rulers whose three hill forts and series of palaces in the city are important attractions. Known as the Pink City because of the colour of the stone used exclusively in the walled city, Jaipur's bazaars sell embroidered leather shoes, blue pottery, tie and dye scarves and other exotic wares. Western Rajasthan itself forms a convenient circuit, in the heart of the Thar desert which has shaped its history, lifestyles and architecture.

Jodhpur:

Jodhpur, once the capital of the former princely state of Marwar, is now the second largest city of Rajasthan. Flanked on its western side by the Mehrangarh Fort, and on the eastern side by the stately sandstone Palace of Umaid Bhawan; the monuments temples and gardens of Jodhpur depict a multi-faceted grandeur.

Jaisalmer:

The name Jaisalmer evokes a vivid picture of sheer magic and brilliance of the desert. Legend has it that Rawal Jaisal laid the foundation of the city in 1156 AD. after consulting a local hermit by the name of Eesul. Tricuta was the hill chosen and Jaisal abandoned his old fort at Lodurva to establish this new capital.

Udaipur:

A famous city of Rajasthan state, standing on the banks of lake Pichola with white marble palaces. Udaipur is one of the most romantic cities of India.

Bikaner:

Founded in 1488, Bikaner is a desert built on an elevation and surrounded by a long embattled wall pierced by five gates. A magnificent fort built between 1588 & 1593 by Raja Raj Singh dominates the city. Season: October to March.

Ajmer:

Founded in 1100 AD by Aijpal Chauhan, Ajmer derives its name from `Ajaya Meru' the invincible hill, at the foot of which the present city stands.

Mount Abu:

Famous for its exquisitively carved marble temples, Mount Abu (1219 meters) is a pretty hill resort in the State of Rajasthan.

Bharatpur:

Bharatpur, an impregnable fortified city is today famous for the nearby Keoladeo Ghana Bird Sanctuary. Once the shooting preserve of royalty, it is perhaps the most spectacular water-bird sanctuary in India.

Ranthambhore:

Nestling at the foot of Aravalli Hills is Ranthambor National Park, a famous tiger reserve under Project Tiger. Ranthambor blends history of Rajput valour with scenic natural beauty and is an ideal gateway for a quiet holiday.

Folk Music and Dances of Rajasthan:

The people of Rajasthan live life to the hilt. After hard work in the harsh desert sun and the rocky terrain whenever they take time off they let themselves go in gay abandon. There is dancing, singing, drama, devotional music and puppet shows and other community festivities which transform the hardworking Rajasthani into a fun-loving and carefree individual. Each region has its own folk entertainment, the dance styles differ as do the songs. Interestingly enough, even the musical instruments are different.

Of considerable significance are the devotional songs and the communities who render these songs. Professional performers like the Bhaats, Dholis, Mirasis, Nats, Bhopas and Bhands are omnipresent across the state. They are patronised by the villagers who participate actively in the shows put up by these travelling entertainers. Some of the better known forms of entertainment are:

Ghoomar Dance:

This is basically a community dance for women and performed on. auspicious occasions. Derived from the word ghoomna, piroutte, this is a very simple dance where the ladies move gently, gracefully in circles.

Gait Ghoomar:

This is one of the many dance-forms of the Bhil tribals. Performed during Holi festival, this is among a few performances where both men and women dance together.

Gait:

Another Holi dance but performed only by men. This becomes Dandia Gair in Jodhpur and Geendad in Shekhawati.

Chart Dance:

This is popular in the Kisherigarh region and involves dancing with a chari, or pot, on one’s head. A lighted lamp is then placed on the pot.

Kachhi Ghodi:

This is a dance performed on dummy horses. Men in elaborate costumes ride the equally well decorated dummy horses. Holding naked swords, these dancers move rhythmically to the beating of drums and fifes. A singer narrates the exploits of the Bavaria bandits of Shekhawati.

Fire Dance:

The Jasnathis of Bikaner and Chum are renowned for their tantric powers and this dance is in keeping with their lifestyle. A large ground is prepared with live wood and charcoal where the Jasnathi men and boys jump on to the fire to the accompaniment of drum beats. The music gradually rises in tempo and reaches a crescendo, the dancers seem to be in a trance like state. Drum Dance: This is a professional dance-form from Jalore. Five men with huge drums round their necks, some with huge cymbals accompany a dancer who holds a naked sword in his mouth and performs vigorously by twirling three painted sticks.

Teerah Taali:

The Kamad community of Pokhran and Deedwana perform this dance in honour of theft deity, Baba Ramdeo. A rather unusual performance where the men play a four-stringed instrument called a chau-tara and the women sit with dozens of manjeeras, or cymbals, tied on all over their bodies and strike them with the ones they hold in their hands. Sometimes, the women also hold a sword between their teeth or place pots with lighted lamps on their heads.

Kathputli:

Puppet plays based on popular legends are performed by skilled puppeteers. Displaying his skill in making the puppets’ act and dance, the puppeteer is accompanied by a woman, usually his wife, who plays the dholak, or drum and sings the ballad.

Pabuji Ki Phach:

A 14th century folk hero, Pabuji is revered by the Bhopa community. The phad, or scroll, which is about 10 metres long, highlights the life and heroic deed of Pabuji. The Bhopas are invited by villagers to perform in their areas during times of sickness and misfortune. The ballad is sung by the Bhopa as he plays the Ravan-hattha and he is joined by his wife who holds a lamp and illuminates the relevant portions at appropriate points.

Maand:

Rajasthan’s most sophisticated style of folk music and has come a long way from the time it was only sung in royal courts, in praise of the Rajput rulers.

Professional singers still sing the haunting ballads of Moomal Mahendra, Dhola-Maru and other legendary lovers and heroes.

List of singers and performers also includes the Mirasis and Jogis of Mewat, Manganiyars and Langas, Kanjars, Banjaras and Dholies. Performances like the Kuchamani Khayal, Maach, Tamasha, Rammat, Nautanki and Raasleela are no less popular. The musical instruments of Rajasthan are simple but quite unusual. Handcrafted by the musicians themselves they are rather unique and include instruments like the Morchang, Naad, Sarangi, Kamayacha, Rawanhattha, Algoza, Khartal, Poongi, Bankia and Da There are dozens of other instruments which are exclusive to Rajasthan only.

It is a rather difficult task to list all the different types of music, dance and entertainment that can be found in Rajasthan. The range is mindboggling.

The Details

Umaid Bhawan
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Web Page:  Yes

 

Languages Spoken:  English

 

Types of Breakfasts:  Indian and American

Special Meals Available:  Yes

 

Room Types:  Rooms, Suites/Rooms, Suites

 

Private Bathrooms:  Yes

Handicap Accessible:  Yes

Smoking:  Yes

Consumption of Alcohol:  Yes

Children:  Yes

Pets:  Yes

 

Amenities/Features:  BBQ, Pool, Satellite TV, TV, Phone, Sundeck, Garden, Alarm Clock

 

Nearby Activities:  Golfing, Horseback Riding, Shopping, Dancing, Sight Seeing, Historical Places, Museums, Castles, Arts & Craft Fairs

 

Suitable For:  Pleasure, Relaxation, Business, Family, Spiritual, Groups, Anniversaries, Honeymoons, Romance, Cultural Experience, Gay/Lesbians

 

Near To:  Lakes, Mountains, Jungles, Desert, Wildlife Sanctuaries

 

Sunsets:  Yes
Sunrises:  Yes
Open:  All Year

 

Additional Comments: 

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